Verbal Or Non-Verbal, That Is The Question

Is your child verbal?

How would you answer this question when you can understand the handful of words that your “non-verbal” child has and know that he can answer yes and no questions with 95% accuracy? Man, oh man, I struggle with this.

Sol’s language center was completely wiped out by the three strokes he had at birth. We’ve always firmly believed that he is not cognitively delayed and that he understood everything we said to him, even though his expressive speech was severely delayed. He started to have words after we did our first round of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and his expressive speech has exploded since we did stem cell therapy back in March. To date, we figure that he has somewhere between 20 – 30 words, has just started stringing 2 words together, and, like Bea, will speak in his own language. (Sometimes I think Bea understands him as I will frequently find the two of them conversing back and forth.) Continue reading

Lately: On Specialists and Therapies

The other day, a neuromotor researcher asked me to send her a list of all the therapies we are doing as well as the specialists we regularly see.  With all the traveling we did and changes Solly went through in the last year, this seemingly simple request was not so simple! After our year of change, in my mind, we really pared down the number of therapies Solly did each week, but our schedule is still pretty full. The biggest difference is that we have more therapies that are fun for Sol and fewer that require him to sit still in a chair.

After racking my brain, here is the list that I sent her:

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One, Two, Three, Kick, Kick, Kick

Solly’s schedule is filled with endless therapies and doctors appointments, sometimes up to 4 appointments a day. Last week, I think we hit an all-time appointment record with 15 appointments in one week! While we’ve adjusted his therapies to try and have as many “fun” therapies as possible and Solly generally comes out of each appointment with a big ol’ smile on his face, I still sometimes worry that he’s missing out on typical toddler fun activities. I find myself wondering, how can I get my special needs kiddo involved in something that other kids his age or of his ability might be interested in that isn’t therapy?

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