An Addendum: Walking in Target

Moments after I published yesterday’s blog post, I received the following text message from Solly’s nanny who was with Solly at Target. I thought it was too cute to keep to myself:

If you ever want to feel better about life, take Solly to Target in the morning. He was mesmerized by a solder, saw his Target BFF (the lady standing next to him in the photo below), and he fell in love with a man who encouraged him and gave him knuckles. Not to mention, every person that walks by him says hi and smiles at him! Oh, and this little kid came up to him and started talking to him! It was so adorable. Literally the whole store walks by and encourages him.

Like I’ve said before, the best way to start a conversation with someone who has special needs is to simply say “hi”. Or, you know, cheer and give words of encouragement when you see a cute kid working really hard to walk in his walker. Inclusion is awesome.

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A Field Trip

One of the biggest obstacles we currently face in Solly’s journey to walking is motivation. Solly CAN walk in his gait trainer – in fact, he walks quite quickly if he sees something he wants – but he has to have a solid reason to walk. That reason changes quickly. Lately, his motivation has been helium balloons, golf clapping and cheering, and high fives, however, we struggle to constantly come up with things that excite him enough to walk.

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We love Target!

So, instead of finding novel objects or cheers to motivate him, Nanny Jen discovered that taking him new places might be the trick. Last week, before his weekly OT appointment, she popped his Rifton Pacer in the trunk of her car and carted Solly over to Target where she plopped him, in his gait trainer, at the entrance of the store. There were new sights and sounds to motivate, not to mention people to impress. Solly spent a full hour walking and exploring the store. He still needed some cheering to get him going (a few shoppers stopped to root him on), but little things like the dollar section and a table with folded t-shirts piqued his interest enough to move his gait trainer along.

Just yesterday, we took another field trip over to our local park, where there is a paved pathway that’s perfect for walking. With his hat on backwards and Nanny Catherine cheering him on, he easily strolled around the park.

Our motivation issue has been solved, for now!

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Cute Kid at the Park

 

 

 

Quick Update: The Hip Situation

A bit of good news for hump day

Hip health is a major concern for many people with cerebral palsy. The reason behind this is largely because spastic (tight) leg muscles can pull the hip out of the socket, causing hip dysplasia where the ball of the hip joint isn’t fully covered by the hip socket. The surgery to correct this is a major one with a long, painful recovery.

In other words: this is something you want to avoid if at all possible.

This is why, against our local doctors’ recommendations, we decided to have Solly undergo selective percutaneous myofascial lengthening (SPML) last year to give his tight muscles a release along with alcohol blocks to help loosen them up. If you’re new to our blog, I wrote a couple of updates on SPML at 2 months and at one year post-op, and also gave an update on Solly’s hip health at 6 months post-op. This surgery was a game changer for Solly’s gross motor development, giving him the opportunity to move his legs more freely so he can now walk in a gait trainer and independently propel his tricycle. Continue reading

Verbal Or Non-Verbal, That Is The Question

Is your child verbal?

How would you answer this question when you can understand the handful of words that your “non-verbal” child has and know that he can answer yes and no questions with 95% accuracy? Man, oh man, I struggle with this.

Sol’s language center was completely wiped out by the three strokes he had at birth. We’ve always firmly believed that he is not cognitively delayed and that he understood everything we said to him, even though his expressive speech was severely delayed. He started to have words after we did our first round of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and his expressive speech has exploded since we did stem cell therapy back in March. To date, we figure that he has somewhere between 20 – 30 words, has just started stringing 2 words together, and, like Bea, will speak in his own language. (Sometimes I think Bea understands him as I will frequently find the two of them conversing back and forth.) Continue reading